How Do You Bring Down a Fever? 5 Tips

During a fever, the body temperature rises to 100.4° Fahrenheit. Flu may be the most common cause of fever.

Fever is one of the most effective mechanisms that our body uses for fighting infections. The average body temperature is 98.6° Fahrenheit, but it may vary from person to person. During a fever, the body temperature rises to 100.4° Fahrenheit. Flu may be the most common cause of fever; however, there may be other causes, which include:

The best way to bring down a fever include:

  • Get some extra fluids: Getting some extra fluids while having a fever helps the sick person a lot. Body fluids are lost through sweat during fever. It is essential to replenish these lost body fluids. Besides, fluids also help to cool the body temperature.
  • Taking sufficient rest
  • Removing extra clothing to allow heat loss through the skin
  • Getting a sponge bath in lukewarm water (85° to 90° Fahrenheit)
  • Eating bland and light foods that are easy to digest

The below tables have summaries of treating different types of fevers in different age groups.

Table 1. Treatment summary of adults and types of fevers
Age Temperatur Treatment
18 years and up Up to 102° F (38.9° C) taken orally Rest and drink plenty of fluids. Medication isn’t needed. Call the doctor if the fever is accompanied by a severe headache, stiff neck, shortness of breath, or other unusual signs or symptoms.
18 years and up Above 102° F (38.9° C) taken orally If you’re uncomfortable, take Tylenol (acetaminophen), Advil/Motrin IB (ibuprofen), or Aspirin. Read the label carefully for proper dosage, and be careful not to take more than one medication containing acetaminophens, such as cough and cold medicines. Call the doctor if the fever doesn’t respond to the medication, is consistently 103° F (39.4° C) or higher, or lasts longer than 3 days.
Table 2. Treatment summary of children and types of fevers
Age Temperatur Treatment
2-17 year Up to 102° F (38.9° C) taken rectally for children ages 2-3 years or taken orally for children older than 3 years Encourage your child to rest and drink plenty of fluids. Medication isn’t needed. Call the doctor if your child seems unusually irritable, lethargic, or complains of significant discomfort.
2-17 year Up to 102° F (38.9° C) taken rectally for children ages 2-3 years or taken orally for children older than 3 years If your child seems uncomfortable, give your child take Tylenol (acetaminophen), or Advil/Motrin IB (ibuprofen). Read the label carefully for proper dosage, and be careful not to give your child more than one medication containing acetaminophens, such as cough and cold medicines. Avoid giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Call the doctor if the fever doesn’t respond to the medication or lasts longer than 3 days.
Table 3. Treatment summary of infants/toddlers and types of fevers
Age Temperatur Treatment
0-3 months 100.4° F (38° C) or higher taken rectally Call the doctor, even if your child doesn’t have any other signs or symptoms
3-6 months Up to 102° F (38.9° C) taken rectally Encourage your child to rest and drink plenty of fluids. Medication isn’t needed. Call the doctor if your child seems unusually irritable, lethargic, or uncomfortable.
3-6 months Above 102° F (38.9° C) taken rectally Call the doctor. The doctor may recommend that you bring your child in for an examination.
6-24 month Above 102° F (38.9° C) taken rectally Give your child Tylenol (acetaminophen). If your child is of age 6 months or older, Advil/Motrin (ibuprofen) is OK too. Read the label carefully for proper dosage. Don’t give Aspirin to an infant or toddler. Call the doctor if the fever doesn’t respond to the medication or lasts longer than 1 day.

Medically Reviewed on 12/23/2020

References

Mayo Clinic. Fever Treatment: Quick Guide to Treating a Fever. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fever/in-depth/fever/art-20050997

Harvard Health Publishing. Treating Fever in Adults. April 2015. https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/treating-fever-in-adults

Treating and Reducing a Fever. https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/OEPR_Treating-and-Reducing-a-Fever.pdf

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